1st Grade - Math

LESSON PROBLEM: You save your things so that you can use them at another time. You keep on putting more and more things in your box or container. How do you know how many you have?


STUDY GUIDE


You have four rice cookies and you buy two more. You keep them in a jar thinking that you will enjoy them some other day with your friends.






The next day, when you open the jar, you want to know how many you have.

How do you find out if you do not know how to add? When you join things or put things together, you have more than before. We add numbers to find out how many there are when two groups have been put together. Like when you have 2 marshmallow rice treats. Your sister gives you 1 more. Now you have 3.



How did you get the answer? You have 2 marshmallow rice treats. You get one more. You count one more beyond 2. Count 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and so on

. When you have 2 marshmallow rice treats you are already at number 2. When you get 1 more, you count one number after 2. This gives you 3. To add, count forward. To add 1, count forward 1. To add 2, count forward 2. To add 3, count forward 3.

To add 2 and 2, count forward two from 2, to get to the number 4. When you add 2 and 2 you get 4. In math, we use a symbol that means to add. The symbol is +. We call this symbol the plus sign. Whenever you see this sign between two numbers, you add them by counting forward from one of the numbers. Count as many steps forward as the other number.

2 + 3 means you count 3 steps forward from 2.

You are already at 2 and you count 3 more. When starting to count, we say 3, 4, 5.

When you count three numbers forward from 2, you get to the number 5.

Now you try counting 2 numbers forward from 3. What do you get?



It does not matter which way you add the numbers. If you add 2 to 3 or 3 to 2, the answer will be the same. Your Mom gives you 2 marshmallow rice treats and your Dad gives you 3. You now have 5 treats. Would it make any difference if your Mom gave you 3 and your Dad gave you 2 marshmallow rice treats?

Do the following:

2 + 1 =

1 + 2 =

1 + 3 =

3 + 1 =

2 + 4 =

4 + 2 =

4 + 3 =

3 + 4 =

4 + 5 =

5 + 4 =

You can learn the addition facts with the help of the following table.


+ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
2 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
3 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
4 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
5 5 6 7 8 9 10
6 6 7 8 9 10
7 7 8 9 10
8 8 9 10
9 9 10
10 10


Using the table, you can add one number to another number to find the total. The numbers in the table do not go beyond 10.

To practice addition facts with the help of the table, choose any number in the first row and then choose any number in the first column. To find the answer, move along until you reach the spot where the row and the column join each other.


Look at the number 5 in the first row. In the first column find 4. To find the total of the two numbers, move right of 4 and down from 5. The two meet in the spot where you find 9. This is the answer.

Use the table to find answers to the following:


3 + 3 =

2 + 4 =

4 + 1 =

7 + 2 =

5 + 3 =

Did you notice that there is no 0 in the table? Zero means nothing. When you add nothing to a number, what happens? You have 2 rice cookies and you do not get any more. The number of cookies that you have does not change. You still have only 2 cookies. 2 + 0 = 2

Now do the following:

1 + 0 =

2 + 0 =

3 + 0 =

4 + 0 =

5 + 0 =








ACTIVITIES

Practice adding numbers using different objects. Now add the same numbers without using objects. Make your own addition worksheet.





EXTENDED LEARNING

Add numbers without using objects or by counting. Learn the addition facts in this lesson so you can add any two numbers easily and quickly. Make an addition game to help you learn the facts.




VOCABULARY
  • forward
  • count
  • add
  • plus
  • sign
  • math
  • further
  • fewer
  • beyond


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